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right now. >>> good wednesday, i'm carl quintanilla, jim cramer, david faber. a lot of corporate earnings today. some of them okay. some of them not so okay upon. implied open looks to be down again even as we had the so far this week the worst day of the year and then the second best day of the year. the volatility continuing today. europe's got some issues, as well. a lot of rampant rumors about various downgrades and a german bond auction that resulted on a record low of a ten-year of 128. our road map begin with the marks looking like it's time to put your hands up and as we prep for the second decline in this roller coaster. it's up and down for two drills, cat getting a double dose of negative comments. >> bank of america dragging down the rest of that sector after it did miss us and it's the only consolation. profits were four times higher than a year ago on cost-cuts and fewer bad loans. >> there's intel beating by a penny last night and expects current revenue, and the decline in pc sales. >> the second consecutive quarters in a row. display ads leads to revenue misses a
are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. >>> welcome back to "squawk". jim is standing by at the cme in chicago. you've got the numbers. >> the numbers 352. and the claims number 368 on the continuing claims. it's about kind of where it is. the revision from last week up 2,000. so it's right kind of as expected. this was the big number. independent of last week's claims numbers over of last three weeks claims have been a big deal. they have indicated some sort of spring swoon. this is an indication how severe it is going to be. from the looks, it's not that big a deal. stock market up from that. these numbers came out as expected, which is not bad compared to two weeks ago. >> thank you for that. we've got reaction from steve liesman. are the numbers as positive as jim was portraying them? >> it's interesting, andrew. we have yet to see confirmation of that weak jobs report come up in the jobless claims. we have a speak up, some of it. now it has settled down back into that 350,000 range. you would think if it deteriorated as much as it has you would see som
morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm carl quintanilla with jim cramer who is tasting mcdonald's new breakfast lineup which we'll talk about this hour. got a triple whammy of dow, dupont, trafrlers, utx pretty good as futures are on the rise. day of reckoning, some have said, netflix soaring after last night's results. in europe, weak pmis out of germany, china, too, but the european markets are pricing in higher expectations this morning for a rate cut from the ecb. our road map begins with users streaming internet flicks, the house of cards paying off for the company and shares skyrocketing for the company. is it too late to buy the stock. >> we're counting down to apple's earnings report and that will be after the close. the shares over the $400 mark. one way or the other. >> luxury not dead, at least not according to coach and we'll dig deeper into those numbers. >> u.s. airways and delta beating those numbers. >> not quite as sanguine. we'll take a look at the airline sector and talk about travel turbulence a bit, as well. >> definitely not comericcal. >> for the fir
at the bottom of the hour. we'll break them down with our apple corps of specialist. and jim grant is publisher of the widely released newsletter bearing his name. wait until you hear what sector he's hot on right now due to none other than the fed's easy money policy. and they call her the queen of real estate, dolly lens the hottest million-dollar home of all we've been showing you all day. find out if it's a house in your community. you're watching the fircnbc, fi the business worldwide. ♪ ♪ [ female announcer ] you're the boss of your life. in charge of long weekends and longer retirements. ♪ ask your financial professional how lincoln financial can help you take charge of your future. ♪ how lin( windnd blowingng )elp you take charge of your future. whwhen buyining a car,, we a all want t to save e . trtruecar'ss certrtified dedealer netetk hahas sold o over 750,0,000 cas to t truecar u users, and sasaved themem ovover one b billion d dollars. so when n you're r ready to buyuy a car,, makeke sure yoyou never r ov. go t to truecacar.com, and fifind out h how much h y you u can saveve
promise to try it find it just for you right here on "mad money." i'm jim cramer and i will see you tomorrow. >>> good evening, everyone. i'm larry kudlow. this is "the kudlow report." another day has passed but we have very few solid answers about the boston marathon bombing. we do now know what kind of devices were used. after that, the new information is few and far between. we are going to go to boston for a live update. >>> the stock markets had a very solid bounce back today after yesterday's big selloff. gold also had a positive day. but i believe the plunge in gold is a very good sign for the economy, just as it was in the '80s and '90s. in other words, some optimism. and senator marco rubio unveils the new immigration reform bill today. here's the key point. when we look at the benefits and score them dynamically, immigration reform will be a huge boost to the economy. "the kudlow report" begins right now. >>> first up tonight, president obama will travel to boston thursday for an interfaith service with bombing victims. more than 24 hours after two bombs ripped through mar
to work with them before on cases. between the fbi and atf there's probably no better lab. as jim will tell you, when a bomb goes off, it may get blown to bits, but those are bits that we can recover. that his agency and the fbi can put together. they can understand the device. and perhaps find a signature aspect to that. so we've got a forensic investigation that's going on as far as the bomb and where it went off and what it was composed of and who may have built it. we also have what you just talked about, chris, that photographic evidence. as you and i talked yesterday, i guarantee you yesterday and today there are photographs of the individual or individuals who placed those devices. we just have to separate the weak from the -- in this case the killers from the crowd and we'll know who did that. >> let me go over to mr. cavanaugh. james, it seems to me a picture dh can be blown up and stud did, what more would you want actually than someone dropping the black bag and walking away from the bomb site? >> chris, i've worked many cases over the years with no pictures at all. so
to jim simons, the founder of jim simons, the founder of renaissance right after the crash, he said his firms stepped away from the markets. that's what happened this time around. this only happened for a minute, but the damage could be much deeper. and for all the people in the u.s., outside the u.s., this is a playbook. so be careful. >> exactly. a playbook, a good analogy there. >> we didn't even get to the issue of whether the s.e.c. will rethinking their ruling on allowing social media for material information, because that, i suspect, will become part of the conversation at some point in all of this. >> got to happen. we're in the final stretch of trading, about 35 minutes before the closing bell sounds. we've got a market up in the triple digits, up 139 points. >> delta air, us airways flying high after posting rare first quarter profits. when we come back, find out if these stocks can soar even higher. >>> also ahead, he's one of the federal reserve's biggest critics. but jim grant has his eyes on two stocks really benefiting from the fed's easy money policies. he's going to giv
delegation heads to washington this week. jim clancy has more. >> reporter: north korea's response to the call of diplomacy has been blustery at best. it demands the world recognize its nuclear and ballistic missile programs as its sovereign right.in exchange for even sitting down to talk >> kim jong un probably feeling very insecure and very unstable. and the more unstable and more insecure he feels, the more the need to hold on to, to cling onto this ultimate weapon of destruction, nuclear weapons. because this is the only thing that could ensure the continuation of the kim dynasty. >> reporter: the west hopes kim jong un's weeks-long propaganda outburst will cause china to make a fundamental shift in its support for pyongyang. that may be answered in a series of meetings in china and washington this week. >> if any country in the world has leverage in dealing with north korea and maybe to the point where north korea will be forced to actually give up, contemplate giving up on its nuclear weapons program, it's china. >> reporter: beijing's interest will be its own. it's about wha
the one and only jim kramler be joining us on the show. and twitter getting into the music wars. our guests say see it as an opportunity for everyone. we will dig into that as well. >> we will see you at 2. it's power house time. mike joins us now. he has received more awards than anyone in its 100 years. he is with prudential fox and roach realtors. welcome. >> nice to be here. thank you. >> let's talk a little bit about the greater philadelphia market. i understand that it is a very strong market right now. correct? >> yeah. we are having fun again. >> good. strongest market you have seen in quite some time? >> yes. strongest market since '05, '06. >> it sounds like it's a tight market? >> that's the big hustle right now. it is incredible how much we have sold in the last months. >> which probably explains the drop of 11% on the average days on the market. >> yes. average days on the market is down and the number of properties available is about 31%. it's the lowest inventory i have had since '04. >> let's take a look at the first offering. two bedrooms, one bath, just under 800 sq
korea. jim maseda joins us from seoul. hi, jim. >> reporter: hi, kelly. well, the past 24 hours have been a pretty good example of the unpredictability of kim junk union and his scene. after all of those signals, it turned out to be a very quiet day in north korea, focused entirely on those celebrations around founding father kim jong il's birthday. but then last night, there was a sudden new threat from the north korean military, which said it would strike south korea without warning if there were another anti-north protest in the south. so this was in reaction to a very small demonstration yesterday here in downtown seoul where a couple of effigies of kim jong un were burned. in the same message, he said the south must apologize for its undig phied acts before talks could happen. despite the angry ultimatum, there does seem to be a shift now towards what they call offramping or tamping down the volume and talking rather than confrontation. that said, those two medium range missiles are reportedly on their launchers in the eastern part of north korea ready to be fired. the south is
as well. let's get jim in on this conversation, international chairman and ceo. jim, when i saw this, i thought, wait a minute, this is unbelievable considering that every casino i've ever been in, they want to keep you inside, not bring you outside. tell me what's at the heart of this idea. >> well, you're right. it's not your father's casino environment. this is to reflect the new consumer, the consumer is experienced samplelers. they want not to be told what to do, and we're building a park that will be the connective tissue between two iconic resorts already, new york new york and monte carlo. we're bringing danny meyers from shake shack out to las vegas for the first time, and we're building a brand new 20,000-seat arena that will anchor this park. so imagine an indoor/out experience where people can go around and not be told what to do, do what they want to do, and i think it's going to benefit the existing resorts we have. liz: and you've also got the hershey's chocolate world. i like chocolate so, of course, i totally -- [laughter] i completely focused on chocolate world. but i
that is the spot where the second bomb went off. former atf bomb investigator jim cavanaugh said it is obvious to him looking at the pictures. >> large injuries were on the side of it. debris field to the left. some protected areas over on the right side that indicate the blast was to one side of the trash receptacle. this was the scene of the blast. >> reporter: we are also seeing close-up photos of the actual pieces of the bomb. showing the pressure cooker deformed by the blast, one of its lids blown to the top of a nearby building. they are a favorite of bomb makers because explosive pressure builds up before it is released. investigators can now begin to trace down where components were bought since they know the maker of the pressure cooker, the type of rechargeable flashlight batteries used -- made in china, but widely available -- and even the type of wire -- also made in china -- used to hook the main components together. bomb technicians are examining two electronic components included in the bombs to see whether they were parts of timers or receivers for a remote detonation signal. a
, jeff, and jim, the ceo of the west coast that have endured many battles. we share the property, share the privilege with boston properties and thank you for the opportunity to develop such a wonderful high quality energy efficient building that we are going to be so proud of. thank you for the opportunity. [ applause ] >> thank you, jerry, very much for those comments. now our final speaker is zuckerman. a man who needs no introduction and a man who i have a tremendous amount of respect for and incredible inspiration to me. he has worked his entire life in numerous capacity to make this a better world. a publishing magnet, he's the chairman and editor of the new york world world -- report and a regular commentator on the mclaunch group. the council or foreign releases and washington for studies and strategic studies and vice-chair of the international peace institute. he's also the vice chairman for the public schools and a past president of the board of trust ee financing for the cancer center in boston. he has helped in many areas in journalism and many others. he has led the com
to justice. [ cheers and applause ] >> heather: an amazing moment. jim gray is a sportscaster and fox news contributor. jim, what is it about a sporting event that can bring us altogether and allow us all to heal just a little bit, maybe for the moment? >> it's always been an escape. it's a chance to set aside all the problems that go on. it brings the community together. it allows everyone to have a place where they can vent their emotions and try and get away from the realities of life. it's been a great healing in many times of crisis throughout our country's history. >> heather: you've been a sportcast terrify for many years. this was done following 9/11. in the days that followed that, liza minelli and belting out new york, new york. that was september 21st. shoe share some of your reflections and times you remember events have been able to, country has been able to heal due to a sporting event? >> i don't think when president bush took the mound at yankee stadium and he threw out the first pitch. the whole thing had just been a month. it was still so very, very fresh. here the leader
witherspoon apparently had trouble walking the line. her and husband jim tot were arrested and jailed early friday morning for an alleged dui and disorderly conduct. according to the police report, while toth was given a sprite test, reese claimed he was not a real police officer so she was handcuffed but not before telling the officer, quote, do you know my name? >> that never works. >> you're about to find out who i am, end quote. in a statement witherspoon said she clearly had too much to drink and is deeply embarrassed. >>> three doors down bassisted to harrell was charged with vehicular homicide after causing a fatal crash that killed a 47-year-old man. harrell was intoxicated and also in possession of over 30 assorted prescription pills. >>> in another entertainment news, "oblivion" easily took first at the box office with $38 million. jennifer lawrence presented bill clinton with a glaad media award and ended up flubbing the president's name. >> we are happy to present glaad advocate change award to president glib -- bill clinton. >> it happens to all of us, you know. it comes up, yo
at the same time. people can also fork out $500 to attend a joe montana autograph signing or $150 to see jim harbaugh at a stadium event. the new stadium will cost $1.2 billion when all is said and done. >>> sal, everything okay in san jose? >> yes, it is. it is a little bit slower than it was. northbound as you drive up through downtown and get into the valley, it will be slow. but we don't have any major crashes on the way. just people getting back to work and we don't have -- we don't see anything really terrible here. the traffic continues to slow on 101 as well by the way getting up to the 880 interchange. we had an earlier crash at the toll plaza. they had to get those cars out of the way. for a while, even the carpool lanes were slowing down. it does look like they've cleared the crash and the traffic is beginning to recover. southbound 880, there was a crash at the bottom of the ramp. 880, it's been causing slow traffic on the nimitz freeway. 7:38. let's go to steve. >>> clear skies, not much of a breeze. hardly anything at all. at the surface, almost everyone says calm. toughest for
attack. good morning, welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm carl quintanilla with jim kramer and david faber live at the new york stock exchange. housing starts beat big, surp s surpassing a $1 million annual rate for the first time since 2008. consumer prices relatively tame up 1.5% year over year. gold after its largest intraday drop on record yesterday and as for europe that they had been the laggard around the world as we saw red arrows earlier in the morning and we'll see if they catch up some of our futures which are improving as the morning goes on. >> quite a session yesterday and people will be looking for some reversals. >> i think they'll take back the 2:45 to 4:00 hit. twitter had it first because the market did want initially react to boston until 3:15. the incident was obviously well before that, and i think you can roll that back because the sense is what's going to happen overnight and that makes sense that people will be worried and the tragedy was the tragedy. hopefully there will be no more and therefore you can take that back a couple of better earnings like a coca
durbin of illinois. >> suarez: and we sit down with the head of the world bank, jim yong kim, about his new push to tackle extreme poverty around the globe. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: rescuers worked in wet weather today to find survivors amid the rubble from the fiery explosion at a texas fertilizer plant last night. late today, authorities acknowledged there were fatalities but declined to confirm how many. earlier estimates ranged from five to 15 though there were reports the toll would go much higher. the cause of the fire and explosion
and jim cramer. >> good morning, jim. >> lots to talk about. we account talk about boston and the impact on the market. i would love to hear your view on the psychology there, but also coca cola there. goldman sachs, j&j, we had good numbers. >> coca-cola doesn't have to say anything positive and people absolutely lap it up as they've done for all of the consumer products company and everies single one whereas, goldman sachs they just put a single boilerplate line about what everybody knows which is the macro environment and you're supposed to throw the stock out. i think that is a mistake, and i think the book value is for real. j & j is blessed. he's making it better. j & j and coca-cola, andrew, after boston, hey, you what? i'm take them. it's after boston. boston signifies the psychological terror that people feel when they buy anything other than what's in the supermarket. >> we were talking, i think in the 6:00 hour about sort of is this going to be a major psychological shift that people have come out and says not only a huge tragedy, but it will change the way people think about
. coming up, a closer look at the stocks on the move ahead of the opening bell. we'll check in with jim cramer coming up next when we return. revolutionizing an industry can be a tough act to follow, but at xerox we've embraced a new role. working behind the scenes to provide companies with services... like helping hr departments manage benefits and pensions for over 11 million employees. reducing document costs by up to 30%... and processing $421 billion dollars in accounts payables each year. helping thousands of companies simplify how work gets done. how's that for an encore? with xerox, you're ready for real business. >>> welcome back to "squawk box." jim cramer joins us fro the new york stock exchange. good to see you, my friend. i need to know two things from you. how do you feel about yahoo and marisa meyer and someone was comparing this to jcp. >> oh, please! >> i wanted to get your view and then i want to know what you think about bank of america. >> first of all, i like what meyer is doing. >> the big problem at yahoo is a big culture, and i also like the idea of no more jumpe
three deaths. cnn's jim spellman is in peoria, illinois. >> good morning, christine. you can see the waters coming up here. this is not too unusual here but it's got about another two feet to go. so far these sandbag levees are holding. they hope that remains the case. from north dakota to indiana, to mississippi. flad watches and warning throughout the middle of the country as rain water from torrential spring storms barrels down rivers and streams. >> so far it's held. >> reporter: in peoria heights, katie eaten hopes these sandbags and this pump will protect her home from the rising illinois river. what's it like to know your home's at risk? >> it's scary. i've had family lose house to floods, so i mean i know what to expect. but it's -- it's scary. >> reporter: at the end of the block, neighbors gail and jerry knew their home would be the first to flood. they spent the last few days removing all their possessions knowing they would likely never move back into their home of 13 years. you were prepared, but what is it like to actually watch your home go under water? >> it's dev
will have one of the echo creators of jim chapin will be here to talk to read his new project. we will see you here tomorrow. "the willis report" as telling a next. ♪ gerri: hello, everybody. i'm gerri willis. tonight on "the willis report" budget cuts bite at airports across the country and passengers feel it. >> i got here and they said that the flight was canceled. gerri: the old adage, sell in may and go away, but how did you invest the right way this year? we will show you how. your boss snooping under facebook and twitter. are your privacy rights gone for good? we are on the case tonight on "the willis report." ♪ gerri: tonight's top story, delays at airports coast to coast. according to the faa, flights into new york, baltimore, and washington are delayed because of not enough controllers on hand to monitor the busy corridors. joining me now, president of boy group international and erik hanson, director of domestic policy for the u.s. travel association. welcome to you both. i will start with you, mike. what do you make of this? the fda is saying many of these delays are two ho
now. u.s. remember at the beginning of the iraq war, jim asked me a question, does this still hold true today? do movie stars need be afraid to speak out? and i would say, yes. the lesson is, if what you care about is your pocketbook, if you want to speak out and be pro patriotic and defend america right or wrong, you'll never get in trouble. if you want to be critical of foreign policy because you belief, as a citizen -- remember, we have a thing called the constitution. all men are created equal. everybody, at least from the beginning, white, male, 2 1, with property, could vote. since then we've expanded -- well, i'm not being sarcastic because in terms of the world to have any white male who was sovereign, that we were sovereign. the american revolution declared the people sovereign rather than a king or queen. you couldn't have a king or queen taking your land away because they had finch it to you through sovereign rights. so if every citizen has a right to say what they should or should not do in our government, we would think we could respect that, and yet at the very begi
for the markets and today, more big swings, michelle. >> let's break it down. joining us is jim mcdonald from northern trust global investments. this week, overall, so far, looks pretty negative. you went into the year very positive. you still positive, despite these two big sell-offs this week? >> we are. i think what's happened today, for example, we've gotten a one-two punch over concerns between european credit and also some worries about the global growth environment. we think we may have a little bit of a pause here, but we're going to see continued growth through the year. it will be rewarded by take risk in the stock market. >> why? >> because with growth keeping up and inflation being under control, monetary policy is going to stay very easy, and we see that as being something that's going to lead to equity returns being positive. >> you have to admit, we've had a very good first quarter, 10% gains for most of the averages, 15% at the most extreme. aren't we due for a correction of some kind? >> well, we could absolutely have a pause here and a small correction wouldn't be off the re
force discussed their findings on >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important report. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese- americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post- 9/11 environment. were's some key questions wanted to address this morning. one is the treatment
joking that jim demint should run for president. this isn't exactly what i had in mind. [laughter] perhaps he misunderstood me. you know, the ting that makes jim -- the thing that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like matt spaulding and the heritage foundation itself so valuable; that is, your shared insistence on making the positive case on conservativism, what conservatives are for. in washington it's common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats stand opposed to each other, obviously, in outspoken partisanship is what almost always gets the most headlines. this negativity is unappealing on both sides, and that helps explain why the federal government is increasingly held in such low regard by the american people. but for the left the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose today is to defend its past gains from conservative reform. but negativity on the right, to my mind, makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative that liberals are for things, and conse
a difference in the development of this project and important report. as jim mentioned, there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning that we want to hit some of the highlights. we hope he will take the entire report, study it through and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i looked back in history to the time during world war ii that we in turn to some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the right and proper thing to do but in light of history, it was an error. as of today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post 9/11 environment. there are some key questions we wanted to address this morning. one, did the treatment of suspected terrorists and u.s. custody rise to the left of torture? second how did this happen and what can we learn from this to make better decisions to the future. we found the u.s. personnel in many instances used interrogation techniques on detainee's that constitute torture. american
30 victims who were missing a limb. abc's jim avila reports on how this tragedy unfolded. >> reporter: two hours after the winners crossed, 4:09 into the race, the amateur runners still filling boston's boylston street, two rapid-fire explosions at the finish line. >> something just blew up! [ explosion ] >> run! go! >> reporter: turning the cherished boston marathon into what one hospital official called a war zone. >> i crossed the 26-mile marker and i saw the first explosion happen. there was some commotion. i saw a fire and smoke. and i didn't know what it was. and then from about me to where that gentleman is standing over there, i literally saw the garbage barrel explode. i saw the flash, the fire, the smoke, and i just ran as fast as i could. >> reporter: cameras were rolling from many angles as the force of the blast actually knocks over at least within of the marathoners. look again. most of the injuries, though, suffered by spectators who came to celebrate the finish. >> a bomb went off. and it knocked me to the ground. and then, you know, everybody started running, panickin
of the task force discussed their findings on wednesday at the national press lub. >> thank you, jim, and thank you for your leadership on the task force, and i want to express my thanks to the constitution project, but also to all of my fellow task force members, what they brought to the table in terms of experience, wisdom, public service, really made a difference in the development of this project and important eport. there's more than 24 findings and recommendations. we can't cover all of those this morning, but we do want to hit some of the highlights. we hope you'll take the entire report, study it through, and look at each of those recommendations. why is this report important? it's important because we as a nation have to get this right. i look back in history to the time during world war ii that we interned some japanese-americans. at the time it seemed like the sandrite proper thing to do. but in the light of history, it was an error. and so today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post-9/11 environment. there's some key questions we
agricultural. thank you all very very much for being here. megan smith, jim kolbe and judson please come forward. we are going to go straight through the noon hour because of the numbers we have. some senators have been thinking of going in for lunch and other meetings that are taking place but we will begin with megan smith who is commissioner of the vermont commission of tourism appointed by -- in 2011. before that she was in the vermont legislature and before she became commissioner she and her husband owned and operated the vermont in which is a very nice place. for over a dozen years. ms. smith, go ahead. >> chairman lacie ranking member grassley members of the committee i'm pleased to be here today on behalf of the vermont department of tourism and marketing and the broader traveling community to highlight the importance of travel related provisions included in immigration reform. vermont is very dependent on tourism. our percentage of jobs in the industry is twice the natural -- national average of 38%. the majority of our businesses are small and family-owned and agri-tourism is
in the united states senate joking or perhaps half joking that jim demint should run for president. this isn't exactly what i had in mind. [laughter] perhaps he misunderstood me. you know, the ting that makes jim demint a great leader is the same thing that has always made people like matt spalding and the heritage foundation itself so very valuable; that is, your shared insistence on making the positive case for conservativism, what conservatives are for. in washington it's common for both parties to succumb to easy negativity. republicans and democrats stand opposed to each other, obviously, and outspoken partisanship almost always gets the most headlines. this negativity is unappealing on pote sides, and that helps explain why the federal government is increasingly held in such low regard by the american people. but for the left the defensive crouch at least makes sense. liberalism's main purpose today is to defend itself past gains -- its past gains from conservative reform. but megativity on the right, to my mind, makes no sense at all. the left has created this false narrative that lib
your bank of america stock or selling it? here to discuss this, jim senegal, financial services analyst from "morningstar". thank you for joining us. what do you think of the report in the first place? banks manipulate the numbers for instance, moving loan-loss reserves over to the balance sheet. other banks have done that. can we believe numbers and are banks worse perhaps than we believe with bank of america? >> bank of america did release some reserves. that is something all the banks are doing. it is something i don't think a lot of investors look at. there is some help to the bottom line there. other than that it was a pretty clean quarter, asking considering all of the unusual charges for bank of america has had in the past few years. i think the problem is, the earnings really aren't anything to get excited about. even though bank of america's problems are receding into the past they're still not making a lot of money and a lot of that has to do with the macroeconomic environment. adam: when you talk about problems receding into the past, the big problem would be countrywide. i t
shrapnel designed to maim anyone standing by and jim avila has more. it's not hard to find out how to build one. >> reporter: it's not. investigators are learning more about the anatomy of the bombs and abc news confirming the common cooking appliance used in their construction was a midsize fager brand pressure cooker. unfortunately, the pot maker sells 50,000 a year of those in the united states. this is what remains of what investigators believe could be the crude but effective bomb used in boston. the american military knows them well. the pressure cooker bomb. homemade and designed to maim and kill. this video of military units detonating one in afghanistan posted on youtube. this one found on the internet from the streets of nepal. so common the department of defense handbook on spotting roadside bombs warns soldiers and marines to be on the lookout for that innocent pressure cooker and publications all over the internet teach the construction of a bomb made from mom's kitchen, why so popular? because pressure cookers seal so tightly and can be filled with nails and ball bearings and
of estimates as asian demand for its software dropped. still, in an interview with cnbc earlier, co-ceo jim hagueman sounded confident that growth in the asia pacific region was still solid. >> in asia, we have had now 13 consecutive quarters of double digit growth. 12, actually. this is the first time we have an issue in asia. what that means is you have an organization that has been growing rapidly. with that comes new demand on leadership. we have been make something changes. in q1 we had a couple of key countries where we were looking for the leadership to take this organization to the next level. that's why it's impacting q1. but if i look at the pipeline and the business out there, we have a very, very solid business also in asia pacific. >> they also said revenue from sap's cloud technology division was a bright spot in the report, jumping 380% from a year earlier. he responded to speculation the company might make its cloud service private, as well. >> we do see what cloud does for our customers is it radically simplifies complexity. running global supply chains is not ease or realt
. and we got a hundred dollars in points from sears to use on jim's mower... hold the phone! ...and points from the grill helped pay for my dress... now you're just pulling my leg. get this, sometimes points just show up in our account. get out of town! with points from shop your way, there are more ways to save than ever at sears. oh and this bracelet... i used points to get it for free. yeah, right. and i'm married to lorenzo lamas. hola. this is how to save. this is sears. >>> good morning to you. it's 8:00. welcome back to "cbs this morning." police searched the home of a person in interest in the boston marathon bombing. investigators are looking for answers and a motive and other cities are on alert this morning. nypd commissioner ray kelly will tell us how this city is responding. first, here's a look at today's "eye opener" at 8:00. >> we'll find out who did this and we will hold them accountable. >> two bombs went out with no warning yesterday near the finish line of the boston marathon. >> the fbi is leading a worldwide investigation but no one has yet been identified as a suspec
be calls for negotiation with this government. bear in mind that these are all legitimize jim jong un's rule. whatever else they do, they are a signal to home that this guy has engainled the outside world on his own terms. it reads very well back home. of course the north koreaian side wants face-saving solutions. given his calculations and the circumstances of this state, i submit that kim jong un and company can stand to lose a little face when they play this way. they deserve to, and if we are smart, we will range that outcome dwsharge that outcome every time we have a pleasant situation like this. thank you. >> thank you. my lane in the road is south korea. south korea's approach, military reform since 2010. it will be perhaps a bit more tactical. cumulatively, south korea is much more likely to respond to a clash. i think the situation has changed not only in the blue house but in the lay of the land as well as the political landscape. first of all, the new south koreaian president has vowed publicly and in private to respond forcibly and really exponentially, the next time nort
county police chief jim johnson, assault weapons are -- quote -- "meant for the battlefield." milwaukee chief of police, ed flynn, "military characteristics are not simply cosmetic in nature. these weapons are designed for combat." end quote. and john walsh, the united states attorney for colorado couldn't be more clear. "these weapons, he said, "are crafted to be as effective as possible at killing human beings." end quote. now, where are we today? seven states and the district of columbia banned assault weapons prior to the newtown, massacre. these are my own state, california, connecticut, d.c., hawaii, maryland, massachusetts, new york, and new jersey. since newtown, legislators in 20 states have introduced bills to either ban assault weapons or strengthen existing bans. 20 states are now contemplating action. connecticut and new york passed laws to tighten their existing bans, to prohibit assault weapons with one military characteristic, which is what we do in this bill. maryland expanded an existing ban on assault pistols to cover rifles and assault shotguns. in massachusetts and
, called it pure am necessary tifment jim sharp, a talk show host in phoenix promised that arizonans are still not taking this sitting down. on denny schaffer's show in new orleans, callsers demanded deportations. quote, i see nothing wrong with putting them on a bus and shipping them back to wherever they came from. a caller named alan told mr. schaffer, the law's the law. the senators filed their 844-page bill after 2:00 a.m. on wednesday. officially beginning what president obama and other supporters hope will be six-week effort to pass it in the senate by early june. hearings on the legislation, which tightens border security and offers an eventual path to citizenship, are set to begin on friday. that's from the "washington times." jacksonville, north carolina. arlene, good morning. democrat. caller: good morning. the gun background check situation. tammy baldwin was just on and she said something very interesting, she said, we already have background checks. so what's wrong with going a little bit more? and that's the problem. the problem is, you can't have a little bit. ce you
that this is the law of the land and going forward i think you will see that. >> host: one question from jim. he writes i'm 62 in good health, why not just go without until something comes of? >> guest: one reason is you will have to pay a fine. it's low in the first year, only $95. it goes up in a few years to 2% of hearing, or $700 or if you sign up for coverage although people worry the penalties are too low. but like anyone, as my mother used to tell me don't go a day without health insurance. you never know when you are going to have a concussion and you never know when you're going to be in a car accident. is it really a risk you want to take? >> host: going to ted from huntington new york on our republican line. good morning, you're on with jenny gold. >> caller: good morning. i would like to know about the policy you're in new york. i want to move out of new york. can this policy follow me you know to another state? or if -- >> host: do you have to change policies with each state you are in? is that what you're asking? >> caller: yes. >> guest: the thing about this lot is it's a state-by-state
of the other questions have been asked. mouest -- yesterday in tntitellige had a briefing by jim clapper on thedg goingforwd. he produced a chart which basically showed, started with fy 2012 and show the effects of the various -- the first sequester and the ongoing sequester, the president's budget and other things that have affected that. it was a very powerful chart. i would ask of you could check with him, perhaps, chart number 11. visual a similar breakdown of what your budget thes like, including sequester on an ongoing basis. what does it do if we don't do anything about it? filed the suit for richelieu -- i found this information to be ry important. the munitions in the amount of funds available. the hobbled to see that data over the next 10 years, building in different places. look at the chart and you'll see what i am saying. >> we will. on thisther comment will sequester and budget. know this as well as i do. one of the first things you have to do in this situation is deferred maintenance. that is not saving. a cost someone will have to pay in the future. i am sure you agree. >
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